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Cathedral of the Assumption, The Kremlin, Moscow, Russia
Cathedral of the Assumption, The Kremlin, Moscow, Russia
TitleCathedral of the Assumption, The Kremlin, Moscow, Russia
Date of OriginalSummer 1903
CreatorBolley, Henry Luke, 1865-1956
Creator RolePhotographer;
DescriptionInterior view of the Cathedra of the Assumption [Успенский собор]. In addition to the candlelit chandeliers, religious themed frescoes adorn the limestone columns, walls and ceilings.
Ordering InformationConsult: http://library.ndsu.edu/ndsuarchives/duplication-services
General SubjectReligion
Subject (LCTGM)Interiors
Iconostases
Chandeliers
Cathedrals
Churches
Interiors
Historic buildings
Orthodox Churches
LocationMoscow (Russia)
Russia
Decade1900-1909
Item NumberBol.5
Format of OriginalLantern slides
Dimensions of Original9 x 10 cm.
Place of PublicationFargo (N.D.)
Transcription"Church of the Assumption - Moscow (where the Czar was crowned)"
NotesTitle supplied by staff.
Biography/HistoryThe Cathedral of the Assumption, is the oldest and regarded as the most important of the several churches located in the Kremlin in Moscow. In 1326 the seat of the Russian Orthodox Churched was transferred there from Vladimir. By the end of the late 1400s, the Cathedral was in poor condition and Ivan III ordered a new cathedral built. Work began in 1472, but before its completion, in 1474, a rare earthquake hit the capital and caused the structure to collapse. The renowned Italian architect, Aristotile Floravanti was then commissioned to design and build a replacement and in 1479 the new cathedral was complete and dedicated. It was the site of the coronation of the first Russian Czar, Ivan the Terrible, in 1547. In 1918, not only was it was damaged during the Russian Revolution it was also closed to the public. It was not until 1990 that it was reopened to the public.
Repository InstitutionNorth Dakota State University Libraries, University Archives
Repository CollectionH.L. Bolley Photography Collection
Collection Finding AidConsult: http://hdl.handle.net/10365/4766
Credit LineUniversity Archives, NDSU, Fargo (Bol.5)
Languageeng;
Digital IDbo000005
Original SourceLantern Slides
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