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James H. Sinclair, U.S. Congressman from North Dakota
James H. Sinclair, U.S. Congressman from North Dakota
TitleJames H. Sinclair, U.S. Congressman from North Dakota
Date of Original1919-04-07
CreatorFoss, Bart O., 1892-1957
Creator RoleArtist
DescriptionPortrait of Congressman James H. Sinclair
Ordering InformationConsult: http://library.ndsu.edu/ndsuarchives/duplication-services
General SubjectPolitics & Government
Subject (LCTGM)Legislators
Portrait drawings
Magazine covers
Periodical illustrations
Personal NameSinclair, James H.
LocationNorth Dakota
United States
Decade1910-1919
Item NumberHD1485.N4 N66
Format of OriginalDrawings
Color images
Dimensions of Original27 x 36 cm.
Publisher of OriginalNational Nonpartisan League
Place of PublicationSaint Paul (Minn.)
Transcription"Congressman James H. Sinclair of North Dakota. Elected by the organized farmers" - Caption below image.
This Week's Cover - James H. Sinclair. The third of the Leader series of portrait sketches of League congressmen is that of James H. Sinclair of the third North Dakota district. Congressmen Sinclair, who took office on March 4, 1919, was born at St. Marys, Ontario, on October 9, 1871. Twelve years later his parents moved to Griggs county, N.D. to take up a homestead, and Mr. Sinclair has been a resident of the state since that time. The family had the usual experiences of the hard pioneer days. In 1895 Congressman Sinclair graduated from the Mayville normal school in the same class with Lynn J. Frazier, now governor of North Dakota for the second term, and like so many of our public men spent several years at school teaching. He was register of deeds in Griggs county for six years.
Following that he moved to Ward county, near Kenmare, where he has since lived, to engage in large-scale farming. Ward county sent him to the state legislature in 1914 and again in 1916. As a actual farmer he took a prominent part in the great fight for state-owned elevators which preceded the birth of the Nonpartisan league, and as a member of the committee which had the famous elevator bill in charge he helped get it out to the house by a vote of 6 to 6. The house turned it down and, as is well known, the farmers who came down to Bismarck to see what was being done were grossly insulted by the politicians. Then came the League, which turned the chamber of commerce politicians out.
Congressman Sinclair has a firm grasp of the farmers' problems from his own experience and he is well informed on the general problems of the people. He is of the quiet kind who knows what he is after and can not be fooled by political gab. There should be a great many more in Washington like him to speak and vote for the common people. - Article accompanying image, on page 2, Nonpartisan Leader, April 2, 1919.
NotesTitle supplied by staff.
Illus. in: Nonpartisan Leader, April 7, 1919, cover.
Repository InstitutionNorth Dakota State University Libraries, Institute for Regional Studies
Repository CollectionNonpartisan Leader periodical collection HD1485.N4 N66
Collection Finding Aidhttp://hdl.handle.net/10365/6983
Credit LineInstitute for Regional Studies, NDSU, Fargo (HD1485.N4 N66)
Rights ManagementIn public domain.
Languageeng;
Digital IDNPL00071
Original SourceNonpartisan Leader, April 7, 1919
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