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What the People Expect
What the People Expect
TitleWhat the People Expect
Date of Original1919-01-27
CreatorBaer, John Miller, 1886-1970
Creator RoleArtist
DescriptionWoman, labeled 'Democracy' atop Earth having kicked soldier, labeled 'Militarism', who is falling down in sky, along with weapons and helmets.
Ordering InformationConsult: http://library.ndsu.edu/ndsuarchives/duplication-services
General SubjectPolitics & Government
Military
Subject (LCTGM)Democracy
Militarism
Earth
Soldiers
Political cartoons
Periodical illustrations
LocationUnited States
Decade1910-1919
Item NumberHD1485.N4 N66
Format of OriginalDrawings
Dimensions of Original27 x 29 cm.
Publisher of OriginalNational Nonpartisan League
Place of PublicationSaint Paul (Minn.)
Transcription"Here we see the big war issue being settled right. It is what the people expect of the peace conference. They were not fighting just to end Prussian militarism but all militarism." - Text accompanying image.
"Important Resolutions by Farmer Legislature. By the passage of a concurrent resolution indorsing President Wilson's '14 Points' and his proposal for the League of Nations, North Dakota has become the first state in the Union to take official action backing the president in his struggle for permanent world-wide peace. Both houses of the legislature have also passed Senator Bowman's concurrent resolution, urging congress to ratify immediately the Susan B. Anthony woman suffrage amendment.
The concurrent resolution indorsing President Wilson's stand for permanent peace was received with cheers when it was first laid before the farmers' caucus. They approved it immediately by unanimous vote and it was the next day introduced in the legislature, where its passage by both houses followed speedily. To let President Wilson know that the farmers were behind him, the text of the resolution was cabled to him in France.
The resolution declares: Be it resolved by the legislative assembly of the state of North Dakota, assembled in its sixteenth regular biennial session: ‘1. That we declare our unfaltering support of the fourteen points of President Wilson, as reasonably interpreted by the labor and democratic forces of the world, and as involving a League of Nations, which shall be governed by the consent of all countries, not by the conquest of any; which shall be governed by the elected representatives of all the peoples, not by the appointed spokesmen of the great private interests; which shall provide and protect equal opportunities and equal rights for the citizens of all nations in their international relations with each other; which shall especially protect the small nations and be the guardian of backward peoples and shall retrain those of any one country who attempt to exploit the peoples or the resources of any other country; which shall have a sufficient military and naval force to police the seas and to protect international boundary lines and power to direct the disarmament of all nations and the demobilization of all armies not deemed necessary for the maintenance of domestic order. 2. That a copy of these resolutions be cabled to President Wilson and be transmitted to the representatives of the labor and democratic organizations of all countries. 3. That in the adoption and transmission of these resolutions we solemnly pledge our support to President Wilson and our co-operation with the labor and democratic organizations of all countries, assuring them that the farmers of America, together with all organizations of labor, join with our president in declaring that ‘we are fighting, not for anything for ourselves, ' but for the peace of the world under a war democracy.'
By a peculiar coincidence, the Nonpartisan league caucus adopted the resolution on January 8, exactly one year after President Wilson had first announced his ‘fourteen points' as a basis for permanent peace." - Article in Nonpartisan Leader, Jan. 27, 1919, p. 4.
NotesCaption title.
Illus. in: Nonpartisan Leader, January 27,1919, p. 3.
Repository InstitutionNorth Dakota State University Libraries, Institute for Regional Studies
Repository CollectionNonpartisan Leader periodical collection HD1485.N4 N66
Collection Finding Aidhttp://hdl.handle.net/10365/6983
Credit LineInstitute for Regional Studies, NDSU, Fargo (HD1485.N4 N66)
Rights ManagementIn public domain.
Languageeng;
Digital IDNPL00056
Original SourceNonpartisan Leader, Jan. 27, 1919
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